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California District 54 Little League

District 54 Safety Mission Statement

Our goal is to provide the safest Little League experience for every player, umpire and adult volunteer in our leagues.

Safety is the responsibility of every participant and we all work together to ensure a safe environment and to promote a culture of injury prevention.

Safety Information

Background Checks

  •  All volunteers must complete an annual background check, as required by Little League (*see below).
  • NOTE: for the 2022 season, per California Assembly Bill 506, fingerprinting will also be required: "An administrator, employee, or regular volunteer of a youth service organization shall undergo a background check pursuant to Section 11105.3 of the Penal Code [which includes fingerprinting] to identify and exclude any persons with a history of child abuse." We are currently awaiting guidance on fingerprinting from Little League International (LLI discussing with state of California).

    *Little League International requires all leagues and districts in the United States to conduct an annual background check, including a nationwide criminal search and a search of the National Sex Offender Registry. Little League's preferred provider, J.D Palatine, has a Criminal File database that contains more than 600 million records, including criminal and sex offender registry records covering 50 states and the District of Columbia, meeting the current Little League Regulation 1(c) 8 & 9 requirement.

A Safety Awareness Plan (ASAP)

  • The ASAP is a safety manual that addresses the individual needs of the league via a minimum of 15 required elements.
  • Every league submits an ASAP, or the league safety plan, every single year. 
  • League ASAPs should be finished by December 31st and fully completed (meaning registration data uploaded) and uploaded to the Data Center by March 1st. 
 

Safety Training: annual safety clinic

  • One manager or coach from each team is required to attend an annual safety clinic.
  • Every manager and coach is required to attend AT LEAST one safety clinic every three years. All are encouraged to attend annually, especially while the coronavirus continues to be a safety concern.
  • All league members are invited to attend the safety clinic.
  • District 54 will be hosting a 2022 Safety Clinic online, with 3 opportunities to tune in (webinar info posted 1 week prior): 
    Sunday, January 30, 2022 at 6:30 pm
    Wednesday, February 2, 2022 at 6:30 pm
    Saturday, February 12, 2022 at 9:00 am

Safety Training: other required trainings (managers, coaches, league officials)

  1. Online Concussion Training, through CDC Heads Up
  2. Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) Prevention Training, via Eric Paredes Save a Life Foundation
  3. Child Protection Program Training (through SafeSport), Abuse Awareness for Adults




Injury Reporting

Local League Injury Reporting

If a player or other person is injured at a field/Little League activity, the Injury Tracking Form is completed and sent to the league safety officer within 24-48 hours. The league safety officer should report the injury to the district safety officer within 24-48 hours (see below).

Each league determines its procedure for completing the injury tracking form: in most cases it is the manager (for injured player), or a league official (for injured adult or non-player). 

Within 24 hours of receiving the injury tracking form, the Safety Officer should follow up with the parent/guardian of the injured player/person and verify the information received, obtain any other information necessary, and check on the status of the injured player/person. 

IF MEDICAL ATTENTION IS REQUIRED, the Little League Accident Notification Form must be completed by the parent/guardian or injured adult as well as a league official (preferably the safety officer).

This form must be submitted to Little League International within 20 days of the incident. It serves to report the injury to Little League, as well as activate the secondary insurance policy carried by Little League.*

District Injury Reporting

The league safety officer should report the injury to the district safety officer by:

1) sending a copy of the injury tracking form to [email protected], OR

2) reporting the injury via the online District Injury Reporting Form (this method does not collect identifying information).

What does the district do with the injury reports?

Injury reports received by the district safety officer are de-identified (all personal and identifying information is removed) and the data are analyzed for patterns, frequency of events, etc. Results are presented to the league presidents at the monthly district meeting during the spring and fall seasons, and are used to identify improvements in practices and procedures toward injury prevention.

Why do we document and report injuries and near misses?

Injury tracking, including near misses, can reveal patterns, which helps inform injury prevention efforts (such as field, training or officiating issues).

Ensures league officials are aware of an injury, follow-up with the family or injured person, and make certain they recover; this includes ensuring(SYN) appropriate return to play after an injury.

Injuries requiring medical attention need to be documented and reported to Little League International.

*The Little League Player Accident Policy, underwritten by National Union Fire Insurance Company (a member company of AIG). is an excess coverage, accident only plan, to be used as a supplement to other insurance carried under a family policy or insurance provided by an employer. The policy is subject to a $50 deductible that is the responsibility of the claimant. If a covered injury requires necessary treatment in the form of medical services or supplies provided by a physician, nurse, therapist, or other medical professional within 30 days after the date of the accident the Company will pay the reasonable expenses incurred.

Such reasonable expenses must be incurred within 52 weeks after the date of the injury to be considered (subject to any deferred benefits). The maximum accident medical expense benefit is $100,000 for any one injury to any one Insured.


Injury Prevention

When the mission is safety, injury prevention is the first step!

EQUIPMENT

Helmets: Must meet NOCSAE specifications and standards (affixed with NOCSAE symbol).

Bats: USABat Standard bats must be used in the Little League Major Baseball Division and below. Either USABat Standard bats or BBCOR bats must be used at the Intermediate (50/70) Baseball and Junior League Baseball Divisions. At the Senior League Baseball Division, all bats must be meet the BBCOR standard.

Catcher’s gear: Catchers must wear a catcher’s helmet (with face mask and dangling throat protector; skull caps not permitted per Little League), chest protector (long-model or short-model), and shin guards. Male catchers must wear a protective supporter and cup at all times.

Protective cups: All young men should wear protective athletic cups while playing baseball, and all male catchers are required to wear them.

Sports bras: All young ladies should wear supportive athletic undergarments.

Balls: Only official Little League balls will be used during practices and games.

Face mask/chin guard for helmets: In order to use a helmet attachment in Little League play, the helmet manufacturer must provide a notice indicating that affixing the protector to the helmet has not voided the helmet’s NOCSAE certification. That notice must be shown to the umpire prior to the game. (per Little League)

Mouthguards: Recommended to protect teeth from injury (due to impact from balls, collisions with other players, etc).


ELBOW (AND SHOULDER) INJURIES

The role of parents and coaches in injury prevention is crucial. When a child complains of arm pain, they MUST act in the best interests of the child. 46% of youth respondents said they were encouraged on at least one occasion to keep playing despite having arm pain (Makhni EC, AJSM).

Risk factors for elbow pain in baseball/softball:

            Pitching while fatigued

            Poor pitching mechanics

            Pitch velocity

            Pitch counts (120 to 130-140 per game)

Prevention strategies

            Limit fatigue and overuse by following pitching/throwing guidelines, taking periodic time off from baseball/softball, and using age-appropriate strength and conditioning programs (consult a professional).

            Maintain range of motion throughout the body and the shoulder.

            Preparing to throw: Warm up to throw, don’t Throw to warm-up! (see next)

DYNAMIC WARM-UP FOR BASEBALL & SOFTBALL

Warm up to throw, don’t throw to warm up!

Begin with a general body warm-up that mimics baseball movements to increase the heart rate and blood flow to muscles, and to prepare the body for more intense versions of these movements.

Progress to a dynamic warm-up that involves gentle, repetitive movements that gradually increase the range of motion, and stays within the normal range of motion. The goal of a warm-up is to optimize, not maximize, the range of motion.

Examples of dynamic warm-ups for baseball and softball from the University of Rochester Sports Medicine.

NUTRITION

Adolescence is the perfect time to teach athletes how to effectively fuel their body for training, competition and recovery. Some excellent tips are listed in the table below, from the article “Fueling and Hydrating Before, During and After Exercise,” from the Nationwide Children’s Sports Medicine website.

 

Before Exercise

During Exercise

After Exercise

When

3-4 hours before

30-60 min before

Exercise lasting <60 min

Exercise lasting >60 min

15-60 min after

2-3 hours after

Nutrition Recommendations

Meal: high carb, moderate protein, low fat & fiber

Snack: carb

 

Snack: carb

Snack: carb & protein

Balanced meal: carb, protein & fats

Hydration recommendations

8-20 oz fluid 1 hour before exercise

None or water

4-6 oz fluid every 15 min

Rehydrate with 16-24 oz fluid per one pound lost through sweat

Examples

- Lunch meat and cheese sandwich

- Grilled chicken, rice, vegetables

- Spaghetti and meatballs

- Peanut butter sandwich

- Pretzels and peanut butter

- Trail mix and banana

 

- Sports drink

- 100% fruit juice

- Orange

- Banana

- Granola bar

- Pretzels

 

- Chocolate milk

- Cheese & crackers

- Protein bar

- Smoothie

- Yogurt & granola

- Hamburger & grilled vegetables

- Salmon, mixed vegetables & rice

- Pizza & salad

- Lasagna

 

 

Weather Safety

  • Heat
  • Lightning and Thunder

Resources & Links

First Aid / CPR Courses
Concussion information

Safety News

COVID-19 Update for Spring 2022

November 1, 2021


COVID-19 Liability Form
October 2020

Fall Ball COVID-19 Update

Updated September 15, 2021

Got Safety Questions?

Q: Why do volunteers need Live Scan fingerprinting this year?

A: New California legislation (AB 506) requires "An administrator, employee, or regular volunteer of a youth service organization shall undergo a background check pursuant to Section 11105.3 of the Penal Code to identify and exclude any persons with a history of child abuse." This background check, per the Penal Code above, includes fingerprints.
-CA AB 506, Section 1, Chapter 2.9 Youth Service Organizations," 18975 (b) 

Send your question to:
[email protected]

Content

Safety Plan ASAP Resources

Manager and Coach Safety Training may be completed using the District 54 Safety Clinic Webinar recording (link below). Note that the slide presentation is a concentrated discussion of the highlights of Little League safety, All Coaches and Managers are REQUIRED to have Training


District 54 Mitigation Plan for Inter League May 2021


CDPH Youth Sports Guidelines

Manager and Coach Safety Training Attendance form:https://forms.gle/K9K6e5mH51kjz97a7




Manager, Coaches and Parents  Training  - Your League President has the code and it is Free to ALL in District 54.
Coaches, you are the #1 reason why players continue to play this game. This T&D program includes everything you need for the season; the skills and strategy you need to teach, drills and practice plans and great approaches for game day.

Parents, we know players accelerate their skill development and develop confidence when they practice and play at home. This T&D program includes instruction on skills, positions, strategy and provides you with lots of drills, games and challenges you can do together at home

 Click to go to the Big Al Training Page.


REPORTING INJURY and TRACKING

Player or Person (anyone at the field) is injured. The tracking form is filled out and sent to the league safety officer and a copy sent to the District Safety Officer  [email protected]

Little League  Injury tracking form

Option 2. For District documentation only you can use the google

Little League Insurance Form, Must be File within 30 days of Injury.

The Little League Player Accident Policy, underwritten by National Union Fire Insurance Company (a member company of AIG). is an excess coverage, accident only plan, to be used as a supplement to other insurance carried under a family policy or insurance provided by an employer. The policy is subject to a $50 deductible that is the responsibility of the claimant. If a covered injury requires necessary treatment in the form of medical services or supplies provided by a physician, nurse, therapist, or other medical professional within 30 days after the date of the accident the Company will pay the reasonable expenses incurred.

Such reasonable expenses must be incurred within 52 weeks after the date of the injury to be considered (subject to any deferred benefits). The maximum accident medical expense benefit is $100,000 for any one injury to any one Insured.



Background Check Information
Little League International requires all leagues and districts in the United States to conduct an annual background check, including a nationwide criminal search and a search of the National Sex Offender Registry. Little League preferred provider, J.D Palatine, has a Criminal File database that contains more than 600 million records, including criminal and sex offender registry records covering 50 states and the District of Columbia, meeting the current Little League Regulation 1(c) 8 & 9 requirement.


WEATHER IS A ISSUE OF SAFETY


Wherever you live, your local Little League® program and its volunteers, players, and parents need to know that a little preparation can make a big difference when there is potentially dangerous weather.

Current weather-tracking technology is better that it’s ever been, which means it’s becoming easier to identify potentially inclement conditions. Checking the weather before a game or practice is an easy task. Coaches and umpires should be quick to postpone a practice or game if the weather conditions become dangerous, Down Load a cell phone app to Monitor: Example is

Download the desktop and mobile apps to get the most precise weather forecasts from weather stations in your neighborhood.

Thunder and Lightning:

The old adage “If you hear it, clear it; if you see it, flee it” is an important one. Baseball and softball fields are big, open spaces, which are susceptible to potential lightning strikes. A strike can hit from up to 10 miles away, which means it could happen before you even see dark clouds in the sky. The only way to be as prepared as possible for a thunderstorm is to monitor the weather. If a storm should strike, have everyone head to an enclosed space. Cars are also safe. Shelter houses without walls and dugouts are NOT safe places. Be sure to wait at least 30 minutes after the storm to begin resuming activities, being sure to monitor the weather anyway you can.

 


Contact

California District 54 Little League

Mac Cameron, P O Box 816
El Dorado, California 95623

Phone: 916-599-0611
Email: [email protected]

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